Archive for Will

About the Author: Will
Author Website: http://willbashor.com

Documentary – Marie Antoinette’s Head: The Royal Hairdresser, the Queen, and the Revolution

Let them eat cake?

OHIOANA BOOK FESTIVAL

VISIT ME at the 2017 Book Festival will be held Saturday, April 8, 2017 at the Sheraton Columbus Hotel at Capitol Square, 75 E. State St., Columbus, OH 43215.

2015 Ohioana Book Festival

Since its inception in 2007, the Ohioana Book Festival has given readers the opportunity to connect with their favorite Ohio writers. Held each spring, the Festival welcomes roughly 100 authors and more than 3,000 visitors every year.

To the Conciergerie!

Marie Antoinette taken to the Conciergerie Prison in the middle of the night of August 1st, 1793 where she will wait for 76 days.

Part1-01-Taken to the Conciergerie revised 11-19

Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days

Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days

 

Final Cover

This compelling book begins on the 2nd of August 1793, the day Marie Antoinette was torn from her family’s arms and escorted from the Temple to the Conciergerie, a thick-walled fortress turned prison. It was also known as the “waiting room for the guillotine” because prisoners only spent a day or two here before their conviction and subsequent execution. The ex-queen surely knew her days were numbered, but she could never have known that two and a half months would pass before she would finally stand trial and be convicted of the most ungodly charges.

Will Bashor traces the final days of the prisoner registered only as Widow Capet, No. 280, a time that was a cruel mixture of grandeur, humiliation, and terror. Marie Antoinette’s reign amidst the splendors of the court of Versailles is a familiar story, but her final imprisonment in a fetid, dank dungeon is a little-known coda to a once-charmed life. Her seventy-six days in this terrifying prison can only be described as the darkest and most horrific of the fallen queen’s life, vividly recaptured in this richly researched history.

Available October 16, 2016

December 1792

On Tuesday, the 11th of December 1792, King Louis XVI was taken from the Temple Prison to stand before the Convention and hear his indictment. He is no longer imprisoned with his son Louis Charles, his sister Élisabeth, his daughter Marie-Thérèse, and Marie Antoinette. Rather, he has been separated from his family in the Temple.

Temple

Marie Antoinette’s Sleigh

Marie Antoinette was a rather attractive and lively image. Though naturally thoughtless, she was a kindhearted woman with mostly good intentions. Indeed, she detested the etiquette of the rigid court, but she was also too ostentatious in her taste for privacy at her Petit Trianon, which only alienated her from the courtiers of Versailles. These were allies dearly missed in the troubling times on the horizon.

An excellent example of Marie Antoinette’s thoughtlessness was her sleigh rides on the boulevards of Paris. Wrapped in a fur-lined velvet cloak with gold braid, she was a “delight for any eye” according to her chambermaid. But her timing was harshly criticized; the poorest of her subjects were freezing to death on the streets at the time.

Sleigh

Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days (Rowman & Littlefield, Dec. 2016)

Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days

Prisoner No. 280 in the Conciergerie

New Cover

This compelling book begins on the 2nd of August 1793, the day Marie Antoinette was torn from her family’s arms and escorted from the Temple to the Conciergerie, a thick-walled fortress turned prison. It was also known as the “waiting room for the guillotine” because prisoners only spent a day or two here before their conviction and subsequent execution. The ex-queen surely knew her days were numbered, but she could never have known that two and a half months would pass before she would finally stand trial and be convicted of the most ungodly charges.

Will Bashor traces the final days of the prisoner registered only as Widow Capet, No. 280, a time that was a cruel mixture of grandeur, humiliation, and terror. Marie Antoinette’s reign amidst the splendors of the court of Versailles is a familiar story, but her final imprisonment in a fetid, dank dungeon is a little-known coda to a once-charmed life. Her seventy-six days in this terrifying prison can only be described as the darkest and most horrific of the fallen queen’s life, vividly recaptured in this richly researched history.

Available for pre-order at Amazon.com

The Royal Executioner

It was incredible that Charles-Henri Sanson was asked to assist with the demonstration of the new invention, the guillotine, for Louis XVI.

The next time that Sanson had an audience with the king was on the scaffold, when Louis was the national razor’s victim.

ASU Magazine Review

Pouf 6 - CopyASU MAGAZINE

Marie Antoinette’s Head: The Royal Hairdresser, the Queen, and the Revolution

By Will Bashor ’97 B.A., Lyons Press, 2013.

 

With the published memoirs of Marie Antoinette’s hairdresser, Léonard Autié, as his starting point, historian Will Bashor takes readers inside the court of Louis XVI and the aristocracy of 18th century France. The story-like accounts of daily life, behind-the-scenes finagling and ill-advised decisions gains credibility and value from Bashor’s meticulous documentation and cross checking of historical accounts of this period. Also helpful are frank disclosures of memoir accounts that could not be verified but that are plausible elements in the story.

An accomplished social climber, Léonard as protagonist offers insights into the character of life in the broader social milieu as well as within the court‘s inner rooms. His affectionate loyalty to Marie Antoinette and attention to her emotional state as well as to her elaborate hairstyles are balanced throughout the book by his awareness of the world as it changed around her. The seeds of revolution are woven expertly throughout the work, even as the reader develops sympathy for the young and often unaware Marie Antoinette. Overall, this nonfiction book is an engaging account of a pivotal moment in French history told from a fresh and revealing perspective.